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Basement Flooding Causes

Basement Flooding Causes

Let me start by describing my house. We are on city water and sewer, and the three floor drains in my basement are connected to the sanitary sewer system. That branch of sewer runs out at the front corner of our house and connects to a branch of our sewer line that handles the toilets and sinks in the main floors of our house out in the front yard. There is also an old well at the back of our house that was connected to the cold water supply in the house when we moved in (a pump in the basement draws water to a small tank in the basement), but I disconnected it and now have the well only connected to an outside spigot. We never had any water in the basement in our first 11 years in the house. That changed two years ago, when out of the blue the whole basement flooded, with water two feet deep at the low point. The water came out of the basement floor drain in the front corner of the basement. Three lines come together at this drain: the one that goes outside, the one that connects to the middle drain and the third that goes straight back. Not sure where this connects to. Possibly the third drain at the back of the basement, below the well pump? Two attempts to have the drain going outside snaked did not fix the problem, and water came in the basement through that front drain a few more times. The only thing that saved me was the use of a floor sump pump, but it took a few days for the water to do down far enough to let me stop running the pump. A company came in November 2011 and did an extensive review and found that the section of sewer line where the two branches connect in the yard was crushed, and found holes in the sewer line handling the toilets and sink where it exits the basement. They fixed both problems, costing me almost $4,000, and the problem seemed to be fixed. Until spring, when the basement flooded again. I should note that before and after the big fix, water would run continously through the basement floor drain, with it running a little deeper if we had rain. I had the sewer guys out again in the spring and they snaked the line and appeared to have fixed the problem. But two weeks ago we had a bad storm and water came up through that front drain again, flooding half the basement. I ran a sump once the power came back on and it got rid of the water after a few hours. Then last week we got hit with several inches of rain. My basement filled quickly; so strong that water shot out of the front drain a few inches high. I needed three sump pumps to keep ahead of the water, and it took a full three days to get all of the water out as it kept coming in, although at a slower rate. I called the drain guys again. They spent four hours checking things out and said they ruled out wastewater coming back into the house, but believe it must be a spring behind the house because the water was cold and clear. They tried plugging the floor drains, but when they did water forced its way up from the floor drain by the back of the house and some came in from the base of the back wall. So am I to believe there is a spring somewhere in the backyard that’s causing water to rush in? Is that well in the backyard a possible culprit? Is there something else I’m not considering? Please help as this is becoming a growing problem and we’re at our wits end. Thanks
basement flooding causes 1

Basement Flooding Causes

Let me start by describing my house. We are on city water and sewer, and the three floor drains in my basement are connected to the sanitary sewer system. That branch of sewer runs out at the front corner of our house and connects to a branch of our sewer line that handles the toilets and sinks in the main floors of our house out in the front yard. There is also an old well at the back of our house that was connected to the cold water supply in the house when we moved in (a pump in the basement draws water to a small tank in the basement), but I disconnected it and now have the well only connected to an outside spigot. We never had any water in the basement in our first 11 years in the house. That changed two years ago, when out of the blue the whole basement flooded, with water two feet deep at the low point. The water came out of the basement floor drain in the front corner of the basement. Three lines come together at this drain: the one that goes outside, the one that connects to the middle drain and the third that goes straight back. Not sure where this connects to. Possibly the third drain at the back of the basement, below the well pump? Two attempts to have the drain going outside snaked did not fix the problem, and water came in the basement through that front drain a few more times. The only thing that saved me was the use of a floor sump pump, but it took a few days for the water to do down far enough to let me stop running the pump. A company came in November 2011 and did an extensive review and found that the section of sewer line where the two branches connect in the yard was crushed, and found holes in the sewer line handling the toilets and sink where it exits the basement. They fixed both problems, costing me almost $4,000, and the problem seemed to be fixed. Until spring, when the basement flooded again. I should note that before and after the big fix, water would run continously through the basement floor drain, with it running a little deeper if we had rain. I had the sewer guys out again in the spring and they snaked the line and appeared to have fixed the problem. But two weeks ago we had a bad storm and water came up through that front drain again, flooding half the basement. I ran a sump once the power came back on and it got rid of the water after a few hours. Then last week we got hit with several inches of rain. My basement filled quickly; so strong that water shot out of the front drain a few inches high. I needed three sump pumps to keep ahead of the water, and it took a full three days to get all of the water out as it kept coming in, although at a slower rate. I called the drain guys again. They spent four hours checking things out and said they ruled out wastewater coming back into the house, but believe it must be a spring behind the house because the water was cold and clear. They tried plugging the floor drains, but when they did water forced its way up from the floor drain by the back of the house and some came in from the base of the back wall. So am I to believe there is a spring somewhere in the backyard that’s causing water to rush in? Is that well in the backyard a possible culprit? Is there something else I’m not considering? Please help as this is becoming a growing problem and we’re at our wits end. Thanks Reply
basement flooding causes 2

Basement Flooding Causes

We have a 100+ farmhouse in a rural setting (septic system, well water). Frost line is 36 inches+. (We live in eastern Canada). On years with heavy snows when we get fast spring thaws or under severe rain conditions, our concrete basement will sometimes flood. The water comes in from the joints between walls and floor, sometimes down the walls from the ground surface, and also from hairline cracks in the basement floor. We have a functioning pump on the east end of the house. When the spring melt occurs very rapidly, we are faced with a situation where the ground is still frozen above the frost line but there is standing water forming at the ground level from the melting snow, and the water table apparently is also rising at the same time, so the sump pump can’t keep up with the amount of water that is coming in. I have no idea if there is a drain tile system still functioning in the house, and I have no idea how to check for this short of removing soil from the exterior walls of the basement, which naturally, we are not keen to do. We assume that a french drain was originally part of the foundation work, but I understand that over time, this can fill in and cease to function. The basement walls also exhibit florescence when the surrounding environment conditions are humid. The house is situated on a very gradual slope of a hill that leads down to an estuary below. We had regrading done around the foundation about ten years ago to try to correct slope issues (when we bought the house in 2004, water was actually being directed towards the foundation because of the grading slope around the property). The grading helped a good deal with water coming down the walls. Flooding now mainly first manifests through puddles that form in the areas where hairline cracks exist in the cement floor. Some of these cracks are so small they are not easily visible to the naked eye. Unfortunately one of the first and worst “puddle” areas to form is right under our wood furnace. The house originally had a stone basement and clay floor, but a previous owner ca. 1970s had the house lifted and installed a concrete basement. We have no idea who he had construct it, and as he was quite the frugal and “home brew” type of guy, there’s no telling whether it was constructed to codes that were in place at that time. What measures would recommend that we undertake to prevent future flooding and address the florescence issue? Reply

Basement Flooding Causes

Basement Flooding Causes
Basement Flooding Causes
Basement Flooding Causes
Basement Flooding Causes

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