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World 'How to Make Bomb in Kitchen of Mom' Featured in Al Qaeda's 1st English Magazine Published July 01, 2010 NewsCore Facebook0 Twitter0 livefyre Email Print Al Qaeda's first English-language propaganda magazine, designed to encourage would-be terrorists into acts of violence, suffered an inauspicious launch -- with only the first three of the 67 pages legible due to an apparent computer glitch on Thursday. The online publication, apparently aimed at British and American readers, includes features such as "Make a Bomb in the Kitchen of Your Mom." Until now, Al Qaeda has relied on Arabic websites to carry its message, but Bruce Riedel, a Brookings Institution scholar and former CIA officer, said the new magazine was intended to build on recent success in the radicalization of Western citizens. “ is clearly intended for the aspiring jihadist in the U.S. or U.K. who may be the next Fort Hood murderer or Times Square bomber,” he said. “The trend we’ve seen in the last year and a half is less global terrorism and much more homegrown domestic terrorism within Muslim communities.” Anwar al-Awlaki, a radical U.S.-born cleric living in Yemen, is thought to be behind the publication called Inspire. U.S. authorities say his online sermons, given in English, have already inspired several terrorist plots in America. The 39-year-old propagandist is said to have helped inspire three of the 9/11 hijackers; the perpetrator of the Fort Hood massacre last year; the Christmas Day underwear bomber and the failed Times Square bomber. The first edition of the magazine, published by Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, includes an article by Awlaki entitled ‘May our souls be sacrificed for you’, as well as “a detailed yet short, easy-to-read manual on how to make a bomb using ingredients found in a kitchen." It also contains part one of a treatise on ‘What to expect in Jihad’ and translated messages from Usama Bin Laden on “how to save the earth,” and his second in command Ayman Al-Zawahari.


Al Qaeda's first English-language propaganda magazine, designed to encourage would-be terrorists into acts of violence, suffered an inauspicious launch -- with only the first three of the 67 pages legible due to an apparent computer glitch on Thursday. The online publication, apparently aimed at British and American readers, includes features such as "Make a Bomb in the Kitchen of Your Mom." Until now, Al Qaeda has relied on Arabic websites to carry its message, but Bruce Riedel, a Brookings Institution scholar and former CIA officer, said the new magazine was intended to build on recent success in the radicalization of Western citizens. “ is clearly intended for the aspiring jihadist in the U.S. or U.K. who may be the next Fort Hood murderer or Times Square bomber,” he said. “The trend we’ve seen in the last year and a half is less global terrorism and much more homegrown domestic terrorism within Muslim communities.” Anwar al-Awlaki, a radical U.S.-born cleric living in Yemen, is thought to be behind the publication called Inspire. U.S. authorities say his online sermons, given in English, have already inspired several terrorist plots in America. The 39-year-old propagandist is said to have helped inspire three of the 9/11 hijackers; the perpetrator of the Fort Hood massacre last year; the Christmas Day underwear bomber and the failed Times Square bomber. The first edition of the magazine, published by Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, includes an article by Awlaki entitled ‘May our souls be sacrificed for you’, as well as “a detailed yet short, easy-to-read manual on how to make a bomb using ingredients found in a kitchen." It also contains part one of a treatise on ‘What to expect in Jihad’ and translated messages from Usama Bin Laden on “how to save the earth,” and his second in command Ayman Al-Zawahari.


AQAP began publishing Inspire in 2010, and its first issue included a now infamous article titled “Make A Bomb in the Kitchen of Your Mom” that instructed would-be violent jihadists to use materials commonly found in a household kitchen, such as a pressure cooker. Analysts suggest the Tsarnaev brothers may have been inspired by this article.


By Max Fisher By Max Fisher April 16, 2013 In June 2010, members of the Yemen-based branch of al-Qaeda published the first-ever issue of an electronic magazine they called "Inspire." The Web-only publication featured broken-English articles, full-color photos and the tantalizingly mockable coverline, "Make a Bomb in the Kitchen of Your Mom." Today, more than a few people have pointed out that the 2010 "Inspire" article included instructions for building a homemade explosive out of a pressure cooker – exactly the sort of device that appears to have been used at Monday's Boston Marathon bombings. More than 24 hours later, with no indication yet that authorities know who committed the attack, some are understandably wondering if this apparent connection might suggest al-Qaeda's hand. But there are some good reasons to hold off on drawing any conclusions from the fact that "Inspire" wrote about pressure cooker bombs. Recall that the magazine was published in English, available for free online and widely covered in Western media. The issue was downloaded over 5,000 times on the jihadist forum Taawhed, more popular than any other issue since then, suggesting that a number of the downloaders were merely following their curiosity. The issue showed up on Western download sites more commonly used to distribute pirated music and movies, where it was passed around as a novelty item. It appears, in other words, to have flown to the far corners of the Web, where just about anyone could have picked it up and read all about pressure-cooker bombs. And "Inspire" was far from the first extremist publication to distribute instructions for making pressure-cooker bombs. Yair Rosenberg of Tablet Magazine points out on Twitter that "The Anarchist's Cookbook," published in 1971, also included information on how to make them. The book appears to have provided the necessary instructions for at least one such bombing, in 1976 at Grand Central Station. In 1973, police had discovered a similar device in the New York Port Authority building. Today, there appears to be a miniature subculture of Americans building small pressure-cooker bombs for the exclusive purpose of detonating them harmlessly in empty fields and posting video of the explosion to YouTube. None of this is to dismiss the possibility that al-Qaeda or any other group could ultimately be connected to the Boston Marathon bombings. But it's worth keeping in mind that the June 2010 issue of al-Qaeda's "Inspire" was not exactly publishing privileged information when it discussed the horrific potential of gluing nails to the inside of a pressure cooker and placing it in a populated area.


In June 2010, members of the Yemen-based branch of al-Qaeda published the first-ever issue of an electronic magazine they called "Inspire." The Web-only publication featured broken-English articles, full-color photos and the tantalizingly mockable coverline, "Make a Bomb in the Kitchen of Your Mom."


Notably, Army Pfc. Naser Jason Abdo, who was convicted and sentenced to life in prison last year for the Fort Hood restaurant bombing plot, was discovered to have a copy of the “How to build a bomb in the kitchen of your mom” article, according to the FBI. Investigators found bombmaking materials in his hotel that included a pressure cooker and gunpowder, according to testimony at his trial.


CAIRO — Homemade bombs built from pressure cookers, a version of which was used in the Boston Marathon bombings, have been a frequent weapon of militants in Afghanistan, India and Pakistan. Al-Qaeda’s branch in Yemen once published an online manual on how to make one, urging “lone jihadis” to act on their own to carry out attacks.


And "Inspire" was far from the first extremist publication to distribute instructions for making pressure-cooker bombs. Yair Rosenberg of Tablet Magazine points out on Twitter that "The Anarchist's Cookbook," published in 1971, also included information on how to make them. The book appears to have provided the necessary instructions for at least one such bombing, in 1976 at Grand Central Station. In 1973, police had discovered a similar device in the New York Port Authority building.


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